Where's God In All of This?

Looking for ways to connect with the divine when TV just doesn't cut it anymore

#0175sva – Joyce Meyer’s Money & Lifestyle


 

The Meyer Family Compound. 

Joyce Meyer Ministries bought these 5 homes for Meyer and her family. The Ministry pays all expenses, including landscaping and lawn care, property taxes and rehab work. Meyer, her husband and each of their four married children live in the homes, free of charge.

 

1) Residence of: Joyce and Dave Meyer
Bought: April 27th, 1999
Purchase Price: About $795,000
Square Footage: 10,000
Cost of Improvements: $1.1 Million
Features: 6 Bedrooms, 5 Bathrooms, Gold Putting Green, Swimming pool, 8 Car Heated and Cooled Garage,  Guest House with 2 more bedrooms, Gazebo.
  
 3) Residence of: Son, David Meyer and his wife Joy Meyer.
Bought: June 18, 2001
Purchase Price: $725,000
Square Footage: 4,000
Cost of Improvements: Unknown
Features: 2 Story Colonial, 4 Bedrooms, 2 1/2 Bathrooms, 2 Garages and a Utility Shed
   
 5) Residence of: Son, Dan Meyer and his wife Charity
Bought: Mar 13, 2000
Purchase Price: About 200,000
Square Footage: About 2,000
Cost of Improvements: $33,000
Features: Brick Ranch With Full Finished Basement
       
 2) Residence of: Daughter, Sandra McCollom and her husband Steve
Bought: February 12, 2002
Purchase Price: $400,000
Square Footage: About 5,000
Cost of Improvements: About $250,000
Features: 4 Bedrooms, 3 full and 2 half Bathrooms, All-Seasons room, Prayer Room, Media Center and a Home Office.
  
 4) Residence of: Daughter, Laura Holtzmann and her husband Doug
Bought: March 7, 2001
Purchase Price: $350,000
Square Footage: 2,358
Cost of Improvements: $3,000
Features: 3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms with a Fireplace.
  
Photo of Joyce Meyer and Family’s Compound

The Irrevocable Trust

Meyer says she expects the best, from where she lives to how she looks. Much of her clothing is custom-tailored at an upscale West County dress shop. At her conferences, she usually wears flashy jewelry. She sports an impressive diamond ring that she said she got from one of her followers. Meyer has a private hairdresser. And, a few years ago, Meyer told her employees she was getting a face-lift.

Not everything is paid directly by the ministry.

Last year, the Meyers bought a $500,000 atrium ranch lakefront home in Porto Cima, a private-quarters club at Lake of the Ozarks. A few weeks later, they bought two watercrafts similar to Jet Skis and a $105,000 Crownline boat painted red, white and blue that they named the Patriot.

Meyer’s “Trusted” Board

For the most part, Meyer can spend the ministry’s money any way she sees fit because her board of directors is handpicked. It consists of Meyer, her husband and all four of her children — all paid workers — as well as six of Meyer’s closest friends. (Ministry officials said that daughter Laura Holtzmann has now resigned; state records still list her on the board.) “Our family is a huge help to us,” Meyer said. “We couldn’t do this if we didn’t have somebody we trusted.”

Board members Roxane and Paul Schermann are such close friends that for more than a decade they lived in the Meyers’ home. The ministry employed both of them as high-level managers and in 2001 bought them a $334,000 home. Roxane Schermann no longer works at the ministry; her husband continues as a paid division manager. The Schermanns bought the house at the same price from the ministry in January. Delanie Trusty, the ministry’s certified public accountant, also serves as the ministry board’s secretary.

The board decides how the ministry’s money is spent. The salaries of Meyer and her family are set by those board members who are not family members and are not employed by the ministry, Meyer’s lawyer said. The arrangement meets IRS regulations, the lawyer said.

“We certainly wouldn’t have enemies and people we don’t know” on the board, Meyer said. “That wouldn’t make any sense. Anybody who has a board is going to have people in favor of you.”

Meyer and her ministry refuse to tell how much the ministry pays Meyer, her husband, her children and her children’s spouses. “I don’t make any more than I’m worth,” Meyer said. “We’re definitely within IRS guidelines.”

Such an overlap between top administrators and board members concerns the IRS because “the opportunity to manipulate and control the organization is easier to accomplish,” said Bruce Philipson of St. Paul, Minn., the IRS group manager of tax-exempt organizations for this region. (Carolyn Tuft and Bill Smith St. Louis Post-Dispatch 11/15/2003)

In 2000, the Meyers also bought her parents a $130,000 home just a few minutes from where the Meyers live.

The Meyers have put the Mercedes, the lake house, the boat and her parents’ home into an irrevocable trust, an arrangement that tax experts say would help protect them from any financial problems at the minisry.

Meyer says she should not have to defend how she spends the ministry’s money. “We teach and preach and believe biblically that God wants to bless people who serve Him,” Meyer said. “So there’s no need for us to apologize for being blessed.”  

www.inplainsite.org 

Administators Comment:

What do you think about the lavish lifystyle of Joyce Meyer, her children and her closest friends?

Do you think she should be accountable to reveal how much money is taken out for salaries for her and her family?

 So, my question is: How much money “actually” goes for winning souls and preaching the gospel? 

I am applled that Mrs. Meyer does not feel wrong about taking so much of the ministry’s money to live a wealthly lifesyle and feels no need to apologize for it either. 

 Her lifestyle speaks so “loud” that I can’t hear a word she is “saying.”

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